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Fort Gordon

Statement of Work (SOW)

For: Mold Prevention Technology Demonstration at Fort Gordon, GA

WTU Barracks – Bldgs 19751 and 19753

Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generation In-Duct System

Building 19753, Ft Gordon, GA

4/20/2009

DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Contractor shall provide, install and commission an in-duct Hydrogen Peroxide Gas generation system in the HVAC duct of Building 19753 to demonstrate the ability of hydrogen peroxide gas to improve indoor air quality, kill mold, and reduce energy consumption by providing and installing a hydrogen peroxide gas generating system in the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system ductwork of Building 19753 at Fort Gordon, Georgia. The installed system shall produce hydrogen peroxide gas (NOT an aqueous vapor) from water vapor in the air at a concentration recommended by the manufacturer but not to exceed 0.02 parts per million (ppm). The installed system shall not create increased ozone. Contractor shall provide the government with manufacturer approved recommendation for maintenance frequency and procedures for installed equipment as well as recommendations for adjusting existing HVAC equipment and components for compatibility with newly installed Hydrogen Peroxide Gas generation equipment.

Bolling AFB

The hydrogen peroxide gas is odorless and safe to use in occupied spaces. According to OSHA, one part per million of hydrogen peroxide gas is safe throughout the working environment. The ozone-free CIMR® Infection Control Technology only uses one fiftieth (1/50th) of that amount and can actually reduce ozone concentrations in the air to produce oxygen and water vapor. The purpose of the CIMR system is to improve indoor air quality, kill mold, and germs. The installed system shall produce hydrogen peroxide gas (NOT an aqueous vapor) from water vapor in the air at a concentration recommended by the manufacturer but not to exceed 0.02 parts per million (ppm). Contractor shall provide the government with manufacturer approved recommendation for maintenance frequency and procedures for installed equipment as well as recommendations for adjusting existing HVAC equipment and components for compatibility with newly installed Hydrogen Peroxide Gas generation equipment.

Saint Helena Hospital

Hi gang, etc…..

Several years ago (following research done by the Safety Officer, Tom Butler, the hospital placed several of these NASA technology units in the surgery duct work . . . we believe it has helped us lower the SSI rate. In addition, we have small units that we place in patient rooms for any condition that is airborne (or that could have been used had we admitted anyone with lab-identified H1N1). The hospital is using this technology as one way to help prevent HAIs as well as reduce potential exposure rates among patients, personnel, and visitors. So far we are pleased with the results-- to the point that the hospital is placing units in the new OPS center, the cancer center, and the ED duct work . . . I suggest you take a look at the technology . . .

Arlene Taylor PhD

Regional Risk Manager and Director of Infection Control

St. Helena Hospital

St. Helena Hospital - Center for Behavioral Health

Crothall Healthcare

Public Health & Infection Control: How Does Your EVS Team Rate?

Crothall’s EVS teams join our clients on the front lines in the battle to protect the public from infectious diseases, such as SARS and MDR-TB, through thorough planning and training of clinical and non-clinical staff members.

"This situation was one in which we wanted to assist in any way that we could. Supplying access to the CIMR technology was a logical approach to meeting this public health threat." - Bobby Kutteh, CEO, Crothall Services Group

It is no secret that hospitals and other healthcare facilities participate in extensive and thorough pre-planning for a public health crisis.What many fail to recognize is how important non-clinical areas of the organization are to the successful management of just such an occurrence.

Environmental Services, Patient Transportation, and Facilities Engineering and Maintenance must all be part of a comprehensive infection control plan in order to successfully protect all of us from harm.

The First Step - Planning & Training

While planning at the administrative level is important for the management of a potential pandemic, ultimately what occurs at the patient level will determine the success of the outcome. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is imperative that each organization's plan include multidisciplinary coordinated teams. This includes epidemiology and infection control leadership, but also administration, clinical, communications, security, environmental, and engineering representation as well.

When planning for an isolation area, it is important to be sure that the following is considered:

• Airborne isolation capacity exists

• Location of necessary equipment and supplies

• Placement of waste and linen receptacles

• Along with the negative ventilation protocol that was initiated by the facilities team at Grady, Crothall supplied two CIMR air and surface ventilators. Designed to kill more than 90% of all airborne viruses and bacteria within an hour, this system is one of the most efficient means available to stop the spread of infection within clinical settings. According to Bobby Kutteh, CEO of Crothall Services Group,"This situation was one in which we wanted to assist in any way that we could. Supplying access to the CIMR technology was a logical approach to meeting this public health threat."

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